Start Thermoluminescence dating of ceramics

Thermoluminescence dating of ceramics

Luminescence dating refers to a group of methods of determining how long ago mineral grains were last exposed to sunlight or sufficient heating.

Feldspar IRSL techniques have the potential to extend the datable range out to a million years as feldspars typically have significantly higher dose saturation levels than quartz, though issues regarding anomalous fading will need to be dealt with first.

The concept of using luminescence dating in archaeological contexts was first suggested in 1953 by Farrington Daniels, Charles A. Saunders, who thought the thermoluminescence response of pottery shards could date the last incidence of heating.

"Optical dating" typically refers to OSL and IRSL, but not TL.

All sediments and soils contain trace amounts of radioactive isotopes of elements such as potassium, uranium, thorium, and rubidium.

Ioannis Liritzis, the initiator of ancient buildings luminescence dating, has shown this in several cases of various monuments.

The radiation dose rate is calculated from measurements of the radioactive elements (K, U, Th and Rb) within the sample and its surroundings and the radiation dose rate from cosmic rays.

As a dating tool the TL technique has been of great success in authentication of ancient ceramic art objects.

However, a few complicated factors limit the precision and accuracy in age determination.

The ceramics come from two recently excavated sites at “Hellenikon” and “Ligourio” in Argolid, Peloponnese, Greece.

The new method of nuclear dating is described in the paper and appropriately evaluated.

Two archeological ceramic sherds in a single quartz aliquot form have been dated success-fully for the first time, by the newly developed method of optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) with green light-emitting diodes (LED).