Start Research papers on online dating

Research papers on online dating

You decide for yourself if Tinder is ruining relationships … In an analysis of data from a nationally representative survey of more than 4,000 U. adults, Rosenfeld concludes that the Internet is beginning to displace old-school meeting places, like schools and churches, as a place for romantic introductions.

Finkel et al’s (very lengthy) review of several top dating sites and the literature on them is basically a wash for all involves: Most sites are pretty bad, they conclude, in the sense that their matching algorithms don’t actually work.

Further proof that all statistics — particularly statistics on sex and dating — lie.

We have gathered a list of top notch online dating articles as well as studies published by well-known universities and scientists on this page.

Well, this is fun: In an analysis of the same national survey data that Rosenfelt used, Paul — a Ph. candidate at Michigan State — basically comes to the opposite conclusion about online dating and relationship quality. People who meet online are more likely to date than to marry.

And whether or not they made it to the altar, online daters usually broke up more and faster: Over the course of the survey, 32 percent of the online-dating couples had broken up, versus 23 percent of the couples who met offline.

There are, it turns out: Bellou concludes that “Internet expansion is associated with increased marriage rates” among 20-somethings, and hypothesizes that the relationship is causal — in other words, that greater access to online dating, online social networks and other means of communicating with strangers directly causes people to pair up.

As Brad Plumer observed at the time, of course, this doesn’t definitively prove a casual relationship; it’s still very possible that the two things just tend to go hand-in-hand, and don’t contribute to each other.

Per his research, married couples who met online were happier (5.64 points on a satisfaction survey, versus 5.48) and less likely to get divorced (6 percent, versus 7.6).