Start Racial patterns dating marriages

Racial patterns dating marriages

The Council on Contemporary Families is a non-profit, non-partisan organization of family researchers, mental health and social practitioners, and clinicians dedicated to providing the press and public with the latest research and best practice findings about American families.

Many changes in the last half century have affected marriage and divorce rates.

The rise of the women’s liberation movement, the advent of the sexual revolution, and an increase in women’s labor force participation altered perceptions of gender roles within marriage during the last 50 years.

In addition, marriages of women were more likely to end in divorce, as were marriages that began at younger ages.

On average, women married at younger ages than men.

Men who earned a bachelor’s degree were more likely to marry than men with less education.

The chance of a marriage ending in divorce was lower for people with more education, with over half of marriages of those who did not complete high school having ended in divorce compared with approximately 30 percent of marriages of college graduates.

Cultural norms changed in ways that decreased the aversion to being single and increased the probability of cohabitation.